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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 129 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
hostage? >> we would say broken because lots of energy goes into electing these senators individually and then the results are almost nothing. so that's why we would say broken. you could definitely say it's held hostage. but we would say broken because i think regardless of how the deck is, stacks up, republicans, independents and democrats it should not function this way. i mean, we really do believe that. you know, we think our members and working people in this country and most americans would say it's fair. people get elected. at some point, the majority should rule. and that's the way it is in every other democracy in the world. >> but as we talk what's up with harry reid? he does seem to be backing away from the strong reform that you propose. i brought a story from talkingpointsmemo.com. senate majority leader harry reid is voicing support for a set of changes to the current filibuster rules that would fall far short of the more sweeping proposals from people like mr. cohen. what's he -- what's up? >> well, i think part of what's up is he's got four or five mocrats, many of th
it an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations. >> the former head of the federal deposit insurance corp., sheila bair. her book is "bull by the horns." sunday night at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. >> in 2009, president obama attended a service at st. john's applicable church from across the white house. and they went to the capital for the health and inaugural address. here is a look from the activities of 2009 carried . [applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] >> ladies and gentlemen. the chief justice of the united states and the associate justices of the supreme court of the united states. ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, mr. william m daley, mr. john w rogers junior, mr. patrick g ryan -- cochairs of the 56th presidential inaugural committee. and the executive director of the 56 presidential inaugural committee. ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, the president elect cabinet. >> you are my hero. >> thank you. >> inks for taking care of those people from indiana. -- thanks for taking care of .hose people fr
. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your reform asking for, demanding next tuesday? >> four things. one, that the majority leader of the senate can put a bill on the floor for discussion and debate. right now he can't do that unless he has 60 votes to do that. he can't even proceed. >> number two. >> number two, nominations. the president makes nominations. there needs to be a clear way for those nominations to get discussed in a short period of time. not 30 hours of senate time, which is more than a week. but in a short period of time, they get discussed and they get a vote on nominations. number three, a conference committee. the house passes one bill. the s
illegals, i want to protect legal immigration. >> they have a big problem in national elections. >> president obama has won the election. >> the president right now has a higher approval rating certainly than congress. >> horrible numbers for congress. >> a pitiful 14%. >> pretty bad numbers on john boehner's report card. >> the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. >> i don't see that as a winner for them. >> don't fight battles you can't win. >> it is a troubled time for the party. >> let's stop for a second. >> let's make clear decisions. >> the republican strategy. >> stop talking about rape. >> don't fight battles you can't win. >> it is a troubled time for the party, get something done. >> we have to be the party of new solutions, we're not just going to be the party of no. >> it is groundhog day. >> the conservatives, the retreat, we've come a long way since. >> i'm ezra klein in for lawrence o'donnell, one of the great moments, when redford having just won the election, sits down on the bed taking it all in. the next few words are not just to ever film junky, pretty much to
mile to assure the russians about future u.s. missile defense moves. >> after my election, i will be more flexible. >> it's going to be harder this time. i don't see where u.s./russian relations can productively go. that's going to be a big problem for the president, starting, of course, with syria. but ooh ran is the even bigger issue that is undecided. we have gotten some russian help, so far on iran. but it doesn't mean we will get russian help with the next step. >> the arab spring signaled the fall of middle-east leaders with whom u.s. officials had, for 30 years, cultivated careful relationships. president obama called on hosni mubarak to step down. >> a change must take place. >> allocated u.s. resources for a no-fly zone in libbia, leading to the killing of moammar khadafy. but while calling for bashir al-assad to step down, a war continues. >> overall, president obama's legacy toward the middle-east is one of limited american activism. that is carcaturd by how we handled egypt, libya, syria, iraq. >>. >> there are unanswered questions about the investigation into the
are seeing since the elections, that's for sure, a question who he will be, as he moves into the second term slam. lot of talk about lincoln's second inaugural, which i think by standards is the gold standard and the greatest of the second inaugural addresses that we know. >> because? >> because it came at the pivotal moment of maximum peril for the nation and it was a real statement about how we could be larger as a democracy and reembrace those who had been against the country and come back together. but i have been looking at franklin ross vel's second inaugur inaugural, 1937, which is interesting, because it was a very can candid, honest progress report about what had not yet been accomplished coming out of the great depression but also a statement how we had to come together, useself government as the most noble expression. and use very precise terms, if you go back and look that the speech there is very real room for president obama now to say to the country, these are the things that will are left undone that we, together, must find a way to do >> michael, as a speechwriter first, who
is this is a real imperative. what's new, it also is now an imperative for republicans. the election results from last november made clear the republican party needs a message for latino, asian-americans and immigrant groups if they have any chance of recapturing the white house. >> scott, this is carla marinucci. what's your thoughts on this? we've seen paul ryan, marco rubio extend a hand to president obama so to speak and suggest they are ready to talk about immigration reform. what's the biggest hurdle here? >> well, i think the biggest hurdle in the end is going to be politics, of course, but the issue of citizenship. what marco rubio outlined this week and last weekend is very close to what president obama talked about in 2011. and so i think that will provide some cover for other republicans. when you've got someone like marco rubio, a rising star in the party, paul ryan, saying we're ready to do a deal here, but the devil is in the details as they always say. democrats feel very emboldened on this issue, and they're going to sort of, you know, swing for the fences. they want full legal st
, the white house held a reception for newly elected members of the congress, only 27 of the new republican house members showed up. that's out of a record freshman class that totaled 87. more recently no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had mitch mcconnell, john boehner, lamar alexander attended, they were all invited, they would have joined not only nancy pelosi, harry reid but steven spielberg, tommy lee jones. as tip o'neill famously said about his political foe, ronald reagan, love the sinner. hate the sin. when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neill over to the white house for drinks and raise a glass to one another. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here is hoping it spills over to the next four years and both sides of the aisle make a move to be more social and more civil. and, hence, more productive. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz, starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome "the ed show" from new york. republicans are raising the
, democrats running for re-election and most of them come from midwestern, western states. they have strong, rural communities and therefore are a lot more open to maintaining gun rights and so you will have a lot of these democrats who will be very nervous voting for any big changes and harry reid is one of them. the national rifle association stayed out of the reelection race and he owes it to them to perhaps temper the debate and not necessarily let all of this go through. >> that's one reason why you're seeing the president take executive action and that's something you heard critics and people who had been his supporters criticized him for not doing more of that in his first term and he's signaling that he's willing to do more of that on these big fights and it's about seizing the moment because the further and further you get from the sandy hook tragedy, the less you're likely to achieve and he's trying to make this happen swiftly. >> let's talk about second terms. how have presidents comparatively, how have they feared in his second term. that's when the big scandal happens. the iran
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
for putting out an ad like that. the children of elected officials should be off the table. they shouldn't be part of the debate. they haven't proposed these new rules and new proposals, rather, new initiatives. the president has. and he's fair game, but his kids aren't. with respect to what i've said about the congress, they need to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. they need to get off their duff with their 12% rating and understand the reason why they have the kind of approval rating that they do today is because they haven't done enough to work across the aisle. look, this is an area that -- where there could and should be bipartisan support for sensible legislation. universal background checks, there shouldn't be a disagreement about that. better federal state, local coordination. there shouldn't be a debate about that. there are things that we can do and move forward and things that the congress should do. that's what the people of this country expect them to do. >> los angeles mayor antonio villaraigo villaraigosa. >>> we have aaron blake, political reporter for the "
was so influential, the republican congress named him an honorary member after the 1994 election. >> the people that listen to ten hours of talk radio a week or more voted republican by a three-two-one margin. those are the people that elected the new congress. that's why this is the limbaugh congress. >> as of today, i think we can finally put this book where it belongs in history. right there. the american people have put the brakes on the conservative train that has run over a lot of people in this country. president obama has laid down a different track for america. the president's inauguration yesterday served as proof of a real movement in this country. we are a society now of tolerance, fairness, and acceptance. the country is not afraid of progressive values, or to say the word, liberal, because most of the country believes in progressive liberal values. a majority of americans believe gaye marriage should be legal. most people don't want any cuts whatsoever to social security. even more people want medicare left alone. only 33% want to protect defense spending. on immigr
of elected officials should be off the table. they shouldn't be part of the debate. they haven't proposed these new rules and new proposals, rather, new initiatives. the president has. and he's fair game, but his kids aren't. with respect to what i've said about the congress, they need to be able to walk and chew gum at the same time. they need to get off their duff with their 12% rating and understand the reason why they have the kind of approval rating that they do today is because they haven't done enough to work across the aisle. look, this is an area that -- where there could and should be bipartisan support for sensible legislation. universal background checks, there shouldn't be a disagreement about that. better federal state, local coordination. there shouldn't be a debate about that. there are things that we can do and move forward and things that the congress should do. that's what the people of this country expect them to do. >> los angeles mayor antonio villaraigo villaraigosa. >>> we have aaron blake, political reporter for the "washington post." >> jen sakke, former press se
elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the house has failed to address these pressing issues during the past two years. they have been indifferent. we haven't had the opportunity to vote on any legislation to curb the influence of unlimited and
for its two-time elected democratic president, to say nothing of the first african-american president, it brings together all of the best about this country. >> jennifer: you can see where they're playing from. they just had a shot of actually -- actually from inside the view of a tuba. they had a shot of them, they're up on the platform which is elevated, right. overlooking the mall. so it is a beautiful spot for them to be. right above them is where the president will take the oath. that's where all of the elected officials are seated, where they're seated as well. marine band will be playing for quite awhile here. almost an hour of the lead up to the inauguration. >> it is an aaron sorkin kind of day. west wing kind of day. a day where ritual and politics becomes an important part of keeping the democratic tradition alive. as someone who sometimes sat on the cynical side of things. clearly, it is a representation of the imperial presidency. >> jennifer: we're seeing dick durbin walking right now into the steps, as he's going up, he was obviously a lead player in so much of the putt
the about was re-elected so we don't have to worry about the supreme court being distorted. i do think that's the case. you know over the last couple of years, we've seen state after state introduce restrictions on a woman's right for access. so the law is in place but the states can deny access and then you have some states where there's only one clinic in the entire state that provides the service. >> john: exactly. so what do you say to your constituents who might be opposed to abortion rights who maintain that it's their right because of their beliefs be it religious or otherwise to do everything they can to chip away at these rights of women? >> well, you know, i really find it to be contradictory because the same people who are against choice also say that they are opposed to government interventions and they want government to be small. but yet they want to give government the authority to determine what a woman does with her body and to tell a doctor what a doctor does in an exam room. to me, if you were constent and you were against abortion, then why don't you provide ready access
-controlled house. initially elected with an outsidef of the beltway appeal, the president is now by definition a washington insider and for anything to get done in his second term, he is going to have to play an insider's game. joining me now is one of the most important allies that the president has on the hill. since 1993, he has represented the sixth district of south carolina in the house of representatives where he is now the third highest ranking democrat. congressman james clyburn. it is so lovely to have you here. >> thank you so much for having me. >> i want to talk to you about guns and immigration, but before i get there, i want to talk to you about what happened with the republicans in the house who seem to have done a little mini cave on the debt ceiling, and it looks like they are going to be willing to extend the debt ceiling for three months with which is the cover of the new york times this morning, and what is that about? what is happening? >> well, it seems they are trying to line up their opposition to the president, this debt ceiling trying to line it up with two other big
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
, as well. this as you say was history. 16th president to win election to two consecutive terms and be sworn in. now, they have all the ceremonial swearings tomorrow. this more intimate friend in the blue room, family and close friends. amid all the constitutional moments there was also a light family moment where a dad got to talk to his daughter, take a listen. >> thank you sir. [ applause ] >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> reporter: i did it, he said and sasha said you didn't mess up. vice president biden got to try this out first very early this morning. reason why it was so early is that just sotomayor had to get on to a train to go to new york city to sign her books. she was trying to get to barnes & noble this afternoon in new york city. >> gregg: you got to plug that book, that is more than the vice president of the united states. your publisher wants more book sales. [ laughter ] >> gregg: how might tomorrow's big speech by the president really set the tone and tenor for policy in his second term? >> reporter: very important. saw president bush try to do this in 2005
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
are up for re-election in north carolina or out west or down south or wherever they're from, i don't think he can lift it. and can that's what i'm talking about in terms of overreach. if this was something where you said close the loophole on gun shows, catch the 40% of people who are going into the shows and escaping, buying guns if they're mentally disturbed and we should catch that and reasonable restrictions. the problem in the heller case and what d.c. was doing is they said you couldn't have a gun unless you registered it, but then today wouldn't let you register it. i mean, that's an effective you can't do it. and that does, in fact, go too far. so if it's a common sense -- and, you know, quite frankly, i don't know why ten. i don't know why somebody needs ten bullets, let alone thirty. so ten doesn't seem like some magic number to me. and, again, to the gun owners, that sounds like something somebody made up, ten. so i think that the president'stive orders -- executive orders can be accepted by the republican party, and if they did the incremental approach of background che
now. with the latest results of the national elections we've been saying it more strenuously and more strongly. the bulk of the republican party seems not to be listening, as you just pointed out. they call it a communications problem or they call it a -- we're just not getting the really hard core message of the republican party across. i'm afraid they are getting that message across. and that message is tinged with intolerance for women, minorities, lgbt community and for others who don't, you know, measure up to the mitt romney image of the other percent, the 47% that doesn't count is what republicans simply don't appeal to. >> are they on their way to being a regional party? >> i think they're on their way to committing suicide, very frankly. this has happened before in our history where an existing party has either morphed into another or died and this might just be happening again. if they don't adjust the way they're looking at the rest of this country, if they don't adjust some of their very platform principles, they're done. they're finished. we can put a fork in them. they'r
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
the president re-elected. this time though, it's about guns. now that the president has rolled out his plans for legislation and executive action, he's taking his case to the people with planned speeches around the nation. the white house has already unveiled a white house and a twitter hash tag. >> president obama's on the right side of the history here, he's on the right side of how to keep our children and americans safe. >> i'm very proud of president obama and certainly vice president biden who's done so much work on bringing everybody together. >> he really went big, he went broad. this is a comprehensive approach, an amazing job done by the vice president, incredible courage by the president. >> but the nra vows the fight of the century and republicans strongly condemn the president's ideas. senator blunt said, he's attempting to restrict the second amendment rights of law abiding americans. congressman scalise, any attempt by president obama to take away gun rights will meet strong opposition in congress. it was senator rand paul who went the farthest. >> our founding fathers were ve
of the world in this election in whh he did well with minorities and younger voters and so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so too hopes his second term will speak to that. >> rose: we conclude this evening with part one of a two-part conversation about the presidency of barack obama and the next four years joined by doris kearns goodwin, jon meacham, bob woodward, bob caro, and michael beschloss. >> i know it's the consensus that we're -- barack obama has to do is get along with the republicans. i'd like to say something about that. president obama is fond of quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare everyone's saying we have
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 129 (some duplicates have been removed)